Stoke Report: 2017 Pacific Paddle Games

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Pacific Paddle Games presented by Salt Life stand up paddle race Dana Point
Global Partner

The 2017 Pacific Paddle Games launch this weekend in Dana Point, CA. The grom chargers are frothing to go, the open course holds new excitement and technical skill and, of course, the top pros on the planet are present to make THIS event the most exciting in the world.

Here’s the schedule of events and timetables so YOU can stay abreast of the ACTION.

Mo Freitas Pacific Paddle Games Glenn Dubock
Mo Freitas takes the surf zone buoy by storm in the 2016 Pacific Paddle Games Photo by: Glenn Dubock

Pacific Paddle Games:  Race Descriptions and Time Tables

YOUTH TECHNICAL (1.2 miles)
TIME:  Saturday 11:00-11:30AM

We open this year at the PPGs where we should – with the groms.  The 2017 Youth Technical Course will include 6 turns, using a mixture of rights and lefts. All turning buoys will be outside the surf zone. Competitors will start on the beach, charge through the surf making a left turn on buoy #1. Turn #2 will be a right shoulder turn around the large yellow, U-shaped PPG buoy. This is followed by a left turn on buoy #3, right turn at buoy #4, and a left turn on buoy #5. After buoy #5, competitors will make a right turn on buoy #7, head towards shore, finishing on the beach.

OPEN TECHNICAL (2.4 miles)
TIME:  Saturday, Men 11:30AM-12:30PM/ Women 12:15PM-1:15PM

All Open competitors + Pro Prone Men & Women
The reformatted and longer 2017 Open Technical Course features 6 turns per lap with a mixture of right and left shoulder turns. All turning buoys are outside the surf zone. Competitors start on the beach, make their through the surf to a left turn on buoy #1. Turn #2 will be a right turn around the large yellow, U-shaped PPG buoy. This is followed by a left shoulder turn on buoy #3, another right turn at buoy #4, and a left turn on buoy #5. On the first lap, competitors will make another left turn at buoy #6 which is the small U-shaped PPG buoy. Following the same course for lap two, after buoy #5 competitors will make a right turn on buoy #7, head towards shore and finish on the beach.

OPEN AWARDS: 
TIME:  Saturday, 1:45PM – 3:34PM

PRO TECHNICAL (1.2 miles per lap)
TIME:  Saturday, Men 1:45PM-3:45PM / Women 3:45PM-4:45PM

Men Pro, Women Pro, Pro Jr Men, Pro Jr Women
The Pro Technical course is designed to challenge competitors’ speed, surf skills, and change of direction. In each heat excepting the finals, paddlers will complete two laps of the “bow tie” shaped course which includes a mix of right & left hand turns, and features two buoys inside the surf zone. These two buoys in the surf area will be situated just off the beach in water deep enough to execute a turn, not directly in the impact zone. Pro Men & Women finals will be 3 laps. Two laps: 2.4 miles. Three laps: 3.6 miles

2016 Hammer Buoy Pacific Paddle Games
The Hammer Buoy is often the most strategic turns on the race course. This buoy, deliberately placed in the surf zone, creates pivotal movements within the race. Photo by: Glenn Dubock

DISTANCE (6 miles)
PRO/OPEN/PRONE DISTANCE
TIME:  Sunday 8:30-11:30AM

With a water start, paddlers will make there way south to turning buoy #1 which will be 1.4 miles from the start. After rounding buoy #1 with a left shoulder turn, competitors will head to buoy #2, make a left turn on Buoy #2 and buoy #3, then head south to the southern most turning buoy (#1). On the second lap competitors will make a right shoulder turn at buoy #4 and proceed to the finish line. The Distance Course features a buoy (#2) where the crowd will be able to see the racers position after the first of two laps. Competitors must complete the course in under 3 hours

PRO TECHNICAL FINALS:
TIME:  Sunday, Men’s Technical Semi Final 12:00PM – 1:00PM
Sunday, Pro Jr. Technical Finals 1:00PM – 2:00PM
Sunday, Women’s Technical Finals 2:00PM – 2:30PM
Sunday, Men’s Technical Finals 2:30PM – 3:30PM

TEAM RELAY: 
TIME:  Sunday, Team Relay 3:30PM-4:30PM

AWARDS:  All awards
TIME:  Sunday, 4:30PM – 5:00PM

 

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Evelyn O’Doherty
Evelyn O'Doherty, owner & publisher of the new Standup Journal 2.0, worked her way up the ranks in the world of stand up paddling. A former surfer gone rogue, Evelyn stepped onto a SUP for the first time in 2009 when a plaguing neck injury kept her out of the water from surfing. Discovering the core benefits and expanded perspective on the water that stand up paddling brings, Ev immediately was hooked. She became a strong SUP racer in the North East and a year-round SUP surfer, gathering multiple top brand sponsorships including becoming a team rider for Starboard SUP and a national ambassador for Kialoa, as well as celebrating all aspects of the sport with additional brand ambassadorships including lululemon athletica, Clif Bar, Cobian, Kaenon & Indo Board. Her love of watersports and commitment to advocacy in preserving our marine environments led to a short film made with The Nature Conservancy as part of their Clean Water initiatives on Long Island, NY, called "A New Perspective". Evelyn just keeps paddling. Today, she's stepped up to take over the helm at Standup Journal after having worked for the magazine for 2 years as senior online editor. Her dedication and belief in the power of print to immerse readers in the watersports they love even if they don't have access to the water in a daily existence plus a powerful desire to spotlight the amazing people doing rad sh*t on the water is what drives her vision for Standup Journal 2.0. Evelyn welcomes the conversation about how to make the magazine benefit as many people as possible and encourages feedback, letters to the editor and communication at editor@standupjournal.com . Now, as owner/publisher for Standup Journal., Evelyn continues to live in East Hampton NY where she has daily access to the water. When the swell is working, you can find her in Montauk rattling around in her Ford Ranger surfboards hanging out the back headed for points East.